Not so neither


Not so neither
Neither Nei"ther, conj. Not either; generally used to introduce the first of two or more co["o]rdinate clauses of which those that follow begin with nor. [1913 Webster]

Fight neither with small nor great, save only with the king. --1 Kings xxii. 31. [1913 Webster]

Hadst thou been firm and fixed in thy dissent, Neither had I transgressed, nor thou with me. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

When she put it on, she made me vow That I should neither sell, nor give, nor lose it. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Note: Neither was formerly often used where we now use nor. ``For neither circumcision, neither uncircumcision is anything at all.'' --Tyndale. ``Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it.'' --Gen. iii. 3. Neither is sometimes used colloquially at the end of a clause to enforce a foregoing negative (nor, not, no). ``He is very tall, but not too tall neither.'' --Addison. '' `I care not for his thrust' `No, nor I neither.''' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Not so neither}, by no means. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • He who does not work, neither shall he eat — is Biblical aphrorism derived from II Thessalonians 3:10, which became a slogan for new colonies and socialist societies.The slogan was used by Captain John Smith in setting up his colony in Jamestown, Virginia (1607 1609).According to Soviet… …   Wikipedia

  • Neither — Nei ther, conj. Not either; generally used to introduce the first of two or more co[ o]rdinate clauses of which those that follow begin with nor. [1913 Webster] Fight neither with small nor great, save only with the king. 1 Kings xxii. 31. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • neither — [nē′thər, nī′thər] adj., pron. [ME naither, altered (by assoc. with eyther, EITHER) < nauther < OE na hwæther, lit., not whether (see NO1, WHETHER), not either of two] not one or the other (of two); not either [neither boy went; neither of… …   English World dictionary

  • neither — /nee dheuhr, nuy /, conj. 1. not either, as of persons or things specified (usually fol. by nor): Neither John nor Betty is at home. 2. nor; nor yet; no more: Bob can t go, and neither can I. If she doesn t want it, neither do I. adj. 3. not… …   Universalium

  • neither — nei|ther1 W3 [ˈnaıðə US ˈni:ðər] determiner, pron not one or the other of two people or things →↑either ▪ Would you like tea or coffee? Neither, thanks. ▪ It was a game in which neither team deserved to win. neither of ▪ Neither of them can cook …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • neither — I. conjunction Etymology: Middle English, alteration (influenced by either) of nauther, nother, from Old English nāhwæther, nōther, from nā, nō not + hwæther which of two, whether Date: 12th century 1. not either < neither black nor white > 2.… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • neither — adj., pron., adv., & conj. adj. & pron. (foll. by sing. verb) 1 not the one nor the other (of two things); not either (neither of the accusations is true; neither of them knows; neither wish was granted; neither went to the fair). 2 disp. none of …   Useful english dictionary

  • neither — conj. 1. not either, neither one, not either one. 2. nor, nor yet, no more. adj 3. not either, not the one or the other. pron. 4. not either, not one person or the other, not one thing or the other …   A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • neither here nor there — if a fact is neither here nor there, it is not important. Whether they go or not is neither here nor there as far as I m concerned …   New idioms dictionary

  • neither — 1. pronunciation. Both pronunciations, niy dhǝ and nee dhǝ, are about equally common. 2. parts of speech. Neither functions in two ways: as an adjective or pronoun, and as an adverb or conjunction. a) adjective and pronoun. Neither means ‘not the …   Modern English usage