Pain


Pain
Pain Pain, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pained} (p[=a]nd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Paining}.] [OE. peinen, OF. pener, F. peiner to fatigue. See {Pain}, n.] 1. To inflict suffering upon as a penalty; to punish. [Obs.] --Wyclif (Acts xxii. 5). [1913 Webster]

2. To put to bodily uneasiness or anguish; to afflict with uneasy sensations of any degree of intensity; to torment; to torture; as, his dinner or his wound pained him; his stomach pained him. [1913 Webster]

Excess of cold, as well as heat, pains us. --Locke . [1913 Webster]

3. To render uneasy in mind; to disquiet; to distress; to grieve; as, a child's faults pain his parents. [1913 Webster]

I am pained at my very heart. --Jer. iv. 19. [1913 Webster]

{To pain one's self}, to exert or trouble one's self; to take pains; to be solicitous. [Obs.] ``She pained her to do all that she might.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To disquiet; trouble; afflict; grieve; aggrieve; distress; agonize; torment; torture. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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