Sting


Sting
Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting of a bee or wasp is a modified ovipositor. The caudal sting, or spine, of a sting ray is a modified dorsal fin ray. The term is sometimes applied to the fang of a serpent. See Illust. of {Scorpion}. [1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) A sharp-pointed hollow hair seated on a gland which secrets an acrid fluid, as in nettles. The points of these hairs usually break off in the wound, and the acrid fluid is pressed into it. [1913 Webster]

3. Anything that gives acute pain, bodily or mental; as, the stings of remorse; the stings of reproach. [1913 Webster]

The sting of death is sin. --1 Cor. xv. 56. [1913 Webster]

4. The thrust of a sting into the flesh; the act of stinging; a wound inflicted by stinging. ``The lurking serpent's mortal sting.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. A goad; incitement. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. The point of an epigram or other sarcastic saying. [1913 Webster]

{Sting moth} (Zo["o]l.), an Australian moth ({Doratifera vulnerans}) whose larva is armed, at each end of the body, with four tubercles bearing powerful stinging organs.

{Sting ray}. (Zo["o]l.) See under 6th {Ray}.

{Sting winkle} (Zo["o]l.), a spinose marine univalve shell of the genus Murex, as the European species ({Murex erinaceus}). See Illust. of {Murex}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sting — Sting, CBE (* 2. Oktober 1951 in Wallsend, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, als Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner) ist ein britischer Rock Musiker, Sänger, Bassist sowie Schauspieler. Sting bei der Premiere des Science Fict …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • STING — (Sequence To and withIN Graphics) is a free Web based suite of programs for a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between protein sequence, structure, function, and stability. STING is freely accessible at EMBRAPA Information Technology… …   Wikipedia

  • sting — [stiŋ] vt. stung, stinging [ME stingen < OE stingan, akin to ON stinga < IE base * stegh , to pierce, sharp > STAG] 1. to prick or wound with a sting: said of plants and insects 2. to cause sharp, sudden, smarting pain to, by or as by… …   English World dictionary

  • sting — ► NOUN 1) a small sharp pointed organ of an insect, capable of inflicting a painful wound by injecting poison. 2) any of a number of minute hairs on certain plants, causing inflammation if touched. 3) a wound from a sting. 4) a sharp tingling… …   English terms dictionary

  • sting — [stɪŋ] verb stung PTandPP [stʌŋ] sting somebody for something phrasal verb [transitive] informal to charge someone too much for something: • The garage stung him for £300. * * * sting UK US …   Financial and business terms

  • Sting — Sting, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stung}(Archaic {Stang}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stinging}.] [AS. stingan; akin to Icel. & Sw. stinga, Dan. stinge, and probably to E. stick, v.t.; cf. Goth. usstiggan to put out, pluck out. Cf. {Stick}, v. t.] 1. To pierce… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sting — sb., et, sting, ene; sy med små, fine sting; sting i siden …   Dansk ordbog

  • Sting FM — is a pirate radio station, located in Birmingham, England. This is very specialised in Afro Caribbean music, including reggae, hip hop, R B and others.The station started going in May 1998. They claim to be Birmingham s first unlicenced radio… …   Wikipedia

  • sting — n: an elaborate confidence game; specif: such a game worked by undercover police in order to catch criminals Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. sting …   Law dictionary

  • sting — (v.) O.E. stingan to prick with a small point (of weapons, insects, plants, etc.), from P.Gmc. *stenganan (Cf. O.N. stinga, O.H.G. stungen to prick, Goth. us stagg to prick out, O.H.G. stanga, Ger. stange pole, perch, Ger. stengel stalk, stem ),… …   Etymology dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.