Disgust


Disgust
Disgust Dis*gust", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disgusted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disgusting}.] [OF. desgouster, F. d['e]go[^u]ter; pref. des- (L. dis-) + gouster to taste, F. go[^u]ter, fr. L. gustare, fr. gustus taste. See {Gust} to taste.] To provoke disgust or strong distaste in; to cause (any one) loathing, as of the stomach; to excite aversion in; to offend the moral taste of; -- often with at, with, or by. [1913 Webster]

To disgust him with the world and its vanities. --Prescott. [1913 Webster]

[AE]rius is expressly declared . . . to have been disgusted at failing. --J. H. Newman. [1913 Webster]

Alarmed and disgusted by the proceedings of the convention. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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