Edge


Edge
Edge Edge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Edged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Edging}.] 1. To furnish with an edge as a tool or weapon; to sharpen. [1913 Webster]

To edge her champion's sword. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To shape or dress the edge of, as with a tool. [1913 Webster]

3. To furnish with a fringe or border; as, to edge a dress; to edge a garden with box. [1913 Webster]

Hills whose tops were edged with groves. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. To make sharp or keen, figuratively; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

By such reasonings, the simple were blinded, and the malicious edged. --Hayward. [1913 Webster]

5. To move by little and little or cautiously, as by pressing forward edgewise; as, edging their chairs forwards. --Locke. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms: