In fine


In fine
Fine Fine (f[imac]n), n. [OE. fin, L. finis end, also in LL., a final agreement or concord between the lord and his vassal; a sum of money paid at the end, so as to make an end of a transaction, suit, or prosecution; mulct; penalty; cf. OF. fin end, settlement, F. fin end. See {Finish}, and cf. {Finance}.] 1. End; conclusion; termination; extinction. [Obs.] ``To see their fatal fine.'' --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Is this the fine of his fines? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. A sum of money paid as the settlement of a claim, or by way of terminating a matter in dispute; especially, a payment of money imposed upon a party as a punishment for an offense; a mulct. [1913 Webster]

3. (Law) (a) (Feudal Law) A final agreement concerning lands or rents between persons, as the lord and his vassal. --Spelman. (b) (Eng. Law) A sum of money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease. [1913 Webster]

{Fine for alienation} (Feudal Law), a sum of money paid to the lord by a tenant whenever he had occasion to make over his land to another. --Burrill.

{Fine of lands}, a species of conveyance in the form of a fictitious suit compromised or terminated by the acknowledgment of the previous owner that such land was the right of the other party. --Burrill. See {Concord}, n., 4.

{In fine}, in conclusion; by way of termination or summing up. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.