Inequalities


Inequalities
Inequality In`e*qual"i*ty, n.; pl. {Inequalities}. [L. inaequalitas.] [1913 Webster] 1. The quality of being unequal; difference, or lack of equality, in any respect; lack of uniformity; disproportion; unevenness; disparity; diversity; as, an inequality in size, stature, numbers, power, distances, motions, rank, property, etc. [1913 Webster]

There is so great an inequality in the length of our legs and arms as makes it impossible for us to walk on all four. --Ray. [1913 Webster]

Notwithstanding which inequality of number, it was resolved in a council of war to fight the Dutch fleet. --Ludlow. [1913 Webster]

Sympathy is rarely strong where there is a great inequality of condition. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. Unevenness; lack of levelness; the alternate rising and falling of a surface; as, the inequalities of the surface of the earth, or of a marble slab, etc. [1913 Webster]

The country is cut into so many hills and inequalities as renders it defensible. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

3. Variableness; changeableness; inconstancy; lack of smoothness or equability; deviation; unsteadiness, as of the weather, feelings, etc. [1913 Webster]

Inequality of air is ever an enemy to health. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

4. Disproportion to any office or purpose; inadequacy; competency; as, the inequality of terrestrial things to the wants of a rational soul. --South. [1913 Webster]

5. (Alg.) An expression consisting of two unequal quantities, with the sign of inequality (.gt. or .lt.) between them; as, the inequality 2 .lt. 3, or 4 .gt. 1. [1913 Webster]

6. (Astron.) An irregularity, or a deviation, in the motion of a planet or satellite from its uniform mean motion; the amount of such deviation. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.