To hold out


To hold out
Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one's self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster]

1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; -- mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster]

And damned be him that first cries, ``Hold, enough!'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Not to give way; not to part or become separated; to remain unbroken or unsubdued. [1913 Webster]

Our force by land hath nobly held. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Not to fail or be found wanting; to continue; to last; to endure a test or trial; to abide; to persist. [1913 Webster]

While our obedience holds. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The rule holds in land as all other commodities. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

4. Not to fall away, desert, or prove recreant; to remain attached; to cleave; -- often with with, to, or for. [1913 Webster]

He will hold to the one and despise the other. --Matt. vi. 24 [1913 Webster]

5. To restrain one's self; to refrain. [1913 Webster]

His dauntless heart would fain have held From weeping, but his eyes rebelled. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

6. To derive right or title; -- generally with of. [1913 Webster]

My crown is absolute, and holds of none. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

His imagination holds immediately from nature. --Hazlitt. [1913 Webster]

{Hold on!} {Hold up!} wait; stop; forbear. [Collog] -- {To hold forth}, to speak in public; to harangue; to preach. --L'Estrange.

{To hold in}, to restrain one's self; as, he wanted to laugh and could hardly hold in.

{To hold off}, to keep at a distance.

{To hold on}, to keep fast hold; to continue; to go on. ``The trade held on for many years,'' --Swift.

{To hold out}, to last; to endure; to continue; to maintain one's self; not to yield or give way.

{To hold over}, to remain in office, possession, etc., beyond a certain date.

{To hold to} or {To hold with}, to take sides with, as a person or opinion.

{To hold together}, to be joined; not to separate; to remain in union. --Dryden. --Locke.

{To hold up}. (a) To support one's self; to remain unbent or unbroken; as, to hold up under misfortunes. (b) To cease raining; to cease to stop; as, it holds up. --Hudibras. (c) To keep up; not to fall behind; not to lose ground. --Collier. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hold out for — To wait determinedly for (something one wants or has asked for) • • • Main Entry: ↑hold * * * ˌhold ˈout for [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they hold out for he/she/it …   Useful english dictionary

  • Hold Out — Album par Jackson Browne Sortie 24 juin 1980 Enregistrement 1979 Durée 37 : 48 Genre Rock Producteur Jac …   Wikipédia en Français

  • hold-out — (n.) one who abstains or refrains when others do not, by 1911, from verbal expression hold out; see HOLD (Cf. hold) (v.) + OUT (Cf. out). Earlier as the name of a card sharper s device (1893) …   Etymology dictionary

  • hold out little hope (of something …) — hold out little, etc. ˈhope (of sth/that…) | not hold out any, much, etc. ˈhope (of sth/that…) idiom to offer little, etc. reason for believing that sth will happen • The doctors did not hold out much hope for her recovery. Main entry: ↑hopeidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • hold out little hope (of that …) — hold out little, etc. ˈhope (of sth/that…) | not hold out any, much, etc. ˈhope (of sth/that…) idiom to offer little, etc. reason for believing that sth will happen • The doctors did not hold out much hope for her recovery. Main entry: ↑hopeidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • hold out something — hold out (something) to offer the possibility that something will happen. We don t hold out much hope of finding more survivors. Our supervisor held out the possibility that he would return to work next month. Usage notes: often used with not as… …   New idioms dictionary

  • hold out — (something) to offer the possibility that something will happen. We don t hold out much hope of finding more survivors. Our supervisor held out the possibility that he would return to work next month. Usage notes: often used with not as in the… …   New idioms dictionary

  • hold out something — ˌhold ˈout sth derived to offer a chance, hope or possibility of sth • Doctors hold out little hope of her recovering. Main entry: ↑holdderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • hold out — I (deliberate on an offer) verb make overtures, offer, place at ones disposal, present, proffer, promittere, propone, propose, put forward, submit, suggest, urge, volunteer II (resist) verb balk, be unwilling, hold fast, hold one s own, make a… …   Law dictionary

  • hold out — ► hold out 1) resist difficult circumstances. 2) continue to be sufficient. Main Entry: ↑hold …   English terms dictionary

  • hold out for — ► hold out for continue to demand. Main Entry: ↑hold …   English terms dictionary