To turn out


To turn out
Turn Turn, v. i. 1. To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man turns on his heel. [1913 Webster]

The gate . . . on golden hinges turning. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to revolve as if upon a point of support; to hinge; to depend; as, the decision turns on a single fact. [1913 Webster]

Conditions of peace certainly turn upon events of war. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

3. To result or terminate; to come about; to eventuate; to issue. [1913 Webster]

If we repent seriously, submit contentedly, and serve him faithfully, afflictions shall turn to our advantage. --Wake. [1913 Webster]

4. To be deflected; to take a different direction or tendency; to be directed otherwise; to be differently applied; to be transferred; as, to turn from the road. [1913 Webster]

Turn from thy fierce wrath. --Ex. xxxii. 12. [1913 Webster]

Turn ye, turn ye from your evil ways. --Ezek. xxxiii. 11. [1913 Webster]

The understanding turns inward on itself, and reflects on its own operations. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

5. To be changed, altered, or transformed; to become transmuted; also, to become by a change or changes; to grow; as, wood turns to stone; water turns to ice; one color turns to another; to turn Mohammedan. [1913 Webster]

I hope you have no intent to turn husband. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Cygnets from gray turn white. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

6. To undergo the process of turning on a lathe; as, ivory turns well. [1913 Webster]

7. Specifically: [1913 Webster] (a) To become acid; to sour; -- said of milk, ale, etc. [1913 Webster] (b) To become giddy; -- said of the head or brain. [1913 Webster]

I'll look no more; Lest my brain turn. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (c) To be nauseated; -- said of the stomach. [1913 Webster] (d) To become inclined in the other direction; -- said of scales. [1913 Webster] (e) To change from ebb to flow, or from flow to ebb; -- said of the tide. [1913 Webster] (f) (Obstetrics) To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery. [1913 Webster]

8. (Print.) To invert a type of the same thickness, as temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted. [1913 Webster]

{To turn about}, to face to another quarter; to turn around.

{To turn again}, to come back after going; to return. --Shak.

{To turn against}, to become unfriendly or hostile to.

{To turn aside} or {To turn away}. (a) To turn from the direct course; to withdraw from a company; to deviate. (b) To depart; to remove. (c) To avert one's face.

{To turn back}, to turn so as to go in an opposite direction; to retrace one's steps.

{To turn in}. (a) To bend inward. (b) To enter for lodgings or entertainment. (c) To go to bed. [Colloq.]

{To turn into}, to enter by making a turn; as, to turn into a side street.

{To turn off}, to be diverted; to deviate from a course; as, the road turns off to the left.

{To turn on} or {To turn upon}. (a) To turn against; to confront in hostility or anger. (b) To reply to or retort. (c) To depend on; as, the result turns on one condition.

{To turn out}. (a) To move from its place, as a bone. (b) To bend or point outward; as, his toes turn out. (c) To rise from bed. [Colloq.] (d) To come abroad; to appear; as, not many turned out to the fire. (e) To prove in the result; to issue; to result; as, the crops turned out poorly.

{To turn over}, to turn from side to side; to roll; to tumble.

{To turn round}. (a) To change position so as to face in another direction. (b) To change one's opinion; to change from one view or party to another.

{To turn to}, to apply one's self to; have recourse to; to refer to. ``Helvicus's tables may be turned to on all occasions.'' --Locke.

{To turn to account}, {profit}, {advantage}, or the like, to be made profitable or advantageous; to become worth the while.

{To turn under}, to bend, or be folded, downward or under.

{To turn up}. (a) To bend, or be doubled, upward. (b) To appear; to come to light; to transpire; to occur; to happen. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Turn Out The Stars (coffret) — Turn Out The Stars Album par Bill Evans Sortie 1996 Enregistrement 4, 5, 6, 8 juin 1980 Genre Jazz Producteur Helen Keane (sessions) Jeff Levenson, Bill Kirchner (édition en coffre …   Wikipédia en Français

  • turn out — {v.} 1. To make leave or go away. * /His father turned him out of the house./ * /If you don t behave, you will be turned out./ Compare: THROW OUT. 2. To turn inside out; empty. * /He turned out his pockets looking for the money./ * /Robbers… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn out — {v.} 1. To make leave or go away. * /His father turned him out of the house./ * /If you don t behave, you will be turned out./ Compare: THROW OUT. 2. To turn inside out; empty. * /He turned out his pockets looking for the money./ * /Robbers… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Turn-out — n.; pl. {Turn outs}. 1. The act of coming forth; a leaving of houses, shops, etc.; esp., a quitting of employment for the purpose of forcing increase of wages; a strike; opposed to lockout. [1913 Webster] 2. A short side track on a railroad, whi …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • turn out — [v1] equip; produce accouter, appoint, arm, bear, bring out, build, clothe, dress, fabricate, finish, fit, fit out*, furnish, make, manufacture, outfit, process, put out, rig*, rig out*, yield; concepts 167,205,234 turn out [v2] get out of bed… …   New thesaurus

  • Turn Out The Stars (album) — Turn Out The Stars Album par Bill Evans Sortie 1992 Enregistrement 2 août 1980 Genre Jazz Label Dreyfus Jazz Turn Out The Stars  …   Wikipédia en Français

  • turn|out — «TURN OWT», noun. 1. a gathering of people; assemblage: »There was a good turnout at the picnic. 2. the quantity produced, as by an industry, shop, or machine; total product; output; yield. 3. a wide place in a narrow road, where vehicles can… …   Useful english dictionary

  • turn out — ► turn out 1) extinguish (an electric light). 2) produce (something). 3) empty (one s pockets). 4) prove to be the case. 5) eject or expel from a place. 6) go somewhere to attend a meeting, vote, play in a game, etc. 7) ( …   English terms dictionary

  • turn out for something — turn out (for (something)) to come, appear, or be present for something. A lot of students turned out for the demonstration. The last time she performed here the whole town turned out …   New idioms dictionary

  • turn out for — turn out (for (something)) to come, appear, or be present for something. A lot of students turned out for the demonstration. The last time she performed here the whole town turned out …   New idioms dictionary

  • turn out — (for (something)) to come, appear, or be present for something. A lot of students turned out for the demonstration. The last time she performed here the whole town turned out …   New idioms dictionary