In effect


In effect
Effect Ef*fect", n. [L. effectus, fr. efficere, effectum, to effect; ex + facere to make: cf. F. effet, formerly also spelled effect. See {Fact}.] 1. Execution; performance; realization; operation; as, the law goes into effect in May. [1913 Webster]

That no compunctious visitings of nature Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between The effect and it. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Manifestation; expression; sign. [1913 Webster]

All the large effects That troop with majesty. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. In general: That which is produced by an agent or cause; the event which follows immediately from an antecedent, called the cause; result; consequence; outcome; fruit; as, the effect of luxury. [1913 Webster]

The effect is the unfailing index of the amount of the cause. --Whewell. [1913 Webster]

4. Impression left on the mind; sensation produced. [1913 Webster]

Patchwork . . . introduced for oratorical effect. --J. C. Shairp. [1913 Webster]

The effect was heightened by the wild and lonely nature of the place. --W. Irving. [1913 Webster]

5. Power to produce results; efficiency; force; importance; account; as, to speak with effect. [1913 Webster]

6. Consequence intended; purpose; meaning; general intent; -- with to. [1913 Webster]

They spake to her to that effect. --2 Chron. xxxiv. 22. [1913 Webster]

7. The purport; the sum and substance. ``The effect of his intent.'' --Chaucer.

8. Reality; actual meaning; fact, as distinguished from mere appearance. [1913 Webster]

No other in effect than what it seems. --Denham. [1913 Webster]

9. pl. Goods; movables; personal estate; -- sometimes used to embrace real as well as personal property; as, the people escaped from the town with their effects. [1913 Webster]

{For effect}, for an exaggerated impression or excitement.

{In effect}, in fact; in substance. See 8, above.

{Of no effect}, {Of none effect}, {To no effect}, or {Without effect}, destitute of results, validity, force, and the like; vain; fruitless. ``Making the word of God of none effect through your tradition.'' --Mark vii. 13. ``All my study be to no effect.'' --Shak.

{To give effect to}, to make valid; to carry out in practice; to push to its results.

{To take effect}, to become operative, to accomplish aims. --Shak.

Syn: {Effect}, {Consequence}, {Result}.

Usage: These words indicate things which arise out of some antecedent, or follow as a consequent. Effect, which may be regarded as the generic term, denotes that which springs directly from something which can properly be termed a cause. A consequence is more remote, not being strictly caused, nor yet a mere sequence, but following out of and following indirectly, or in the train of events, something on which it truly depends. A result is still more remote and variable, like the rebound of an elastic body which falls in very different directions. We may foresee the effects of a measure, may conjecture its consequences, but can rarely discover its final results. [1913 Webster]

Resolving all events, with their effects And manifold results, into the will And arbitration wise of the Supreme. --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

Shun the bitter consequence, for know, The day thou eatest thereof, . . . thou shalt die. --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Effect — Ef*fect , n. [L. effectus, fr. efficere, effectum, to effect; ex + facere to make: cf. F. effet, formerly also spelled effect. See {Fact}.] 1. Execution; performance; realization; operation; as, the law goes into effect in May. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • effect — ef·fect 1 n 1: something that is produced by an agent or cause 2 pl: personal property (1) at property: goods …   Law dictionary

  • effect — n 1 Effect, result, consequence, upshot, aftereffect, aftermath, sequel, issue, outcome, event are comparable in signifying something, usually a condition, situation, or occurrence, ascribable to a cause or combination of causes. Effect is the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • effect — [e fekt′, ifekt′; ] often [ ēfekt′, əfekt′] n. [ME < OFr (& L) < L effectus, orig., pp. of efficere, to bring to pass, accomplish < ex , out + facere, DO1] 1. anything brought about by a cause or agent; result 2. the power or ability to… …   English World dictionary

  • effect — que l art fait, Effectio artis. Effect et pouvoir, Effectus. Homme de peu d effect, Parum efficax homo. Tout l effect d amitié git en mesme vouloir, Vis amicitiae est in animorum consensione. Laquelle signification approcha si trespres de l… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • effect — ► NOUN 1) a change which is a result or consequence of an action or other cause. 2) the state of being or becoming operative. 3) the extent to which something succeeds or is operative: wind power can be used to great effect. 4) (effects) personal …   English terms dictionary

  • Effect — Effect, Wirkung, Erfolg, wird besonders von einer erhöhten, einer überraschenden Wirkung gebraucht. In der Kunst darf der Künstler wohl den Effect anbringen, jedoch ohne die Harmonie der einzelnen Theile unter einander zu stören; er darf nicht… …   Damen Conversations Lexikon

  • Effect — Effect, from Latin effectus performance, accomplishment can be used in various meanings: * Any result of another action or circumstance (see pragma , phenomenon, list of effects); * Cause and effect are the relata of causality; * In movies and… …   Wikipedia

  • effect — [n1] result aftereffect, aftermath, backlash, backwash, can of worms*, causatum, chain reaction*, conclusion, consequence, corollary, denouement, development, end, end product, event, eventuality, fallout, flak*, follow through, follow up, fruit …   New thesaurus

  • Effect — Ef*fect , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Effected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Effecting}.] 1. To produce, as a cause or agent; to cause to be. [1913 Webster] So great a body such exploits to effect. Daniel. [1913 Webster] 2. To bring to pass; to execute; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • effect size — UK US noun [C or U] ► a measure of the relationship between two variables (= numbers or amounts that can change), as a way of stating how large the effect of one of the variables is: »Employment is the single most effective factor in reducing re… …   Financial and business terms